Crime

Co-produced by DCTV and HBO for HBO's "America Undercover" Series.

Rape is the fastest-growing and most under-reported crime in America. Every five minutes a woman is raped.

Rape: Cries From the Heartland brutally portrays the physical and emotional trauma suffered by rape victims, who are often further victimized by the legal inability to bring their assailants to justice. Profiles of seven victims whose range in age from eight to seventy-two include visits to hospitals and police stations, interviews with rape crisis counselors and law enforcement officials, and the outcome of each victim's legal battle.

Filmed at the Rape Crisis Center in Memphis, Tennessee, the film presents a disturbing portrait of rape as it really is - an act of violence, not sex - and reveals many of the ways in which this is still one the least understood crimes.

Everyday 96,000 crimes are committed in the United States. Every year more of our nation's youth choose a criminal path instead of an honest one. DCTV decided to go out and find some of these faceless criminals in order to discover what made them follow a life of crime and to find out what society can do to curb the growing epidemic of crime in America.

One Year in a Life of Crime follows Robert, Mike, and Freddy--three professional criminals from Newark, New Jersey. Every day they get in their cars, drive to the suburbs, and steal $500 to $1,000 worth of merchandise. For 12 months we documented their lives. With hidden cameras we recorded a number of crimes as they were actually happening. The ease with which Robert and Freddy cleaned out the silverware in a department store is astounding.

How did these three young men break away from the rules of society and wind up outside the law? We went into their homes to try to find out.

If you are arrested in New York City and can't make bail, Riker's Island will be your new home. Most young men in New York City have a better chance of going to Rikers Island than they do of going to college.

Lock-Up: The Prisoners of Rikers Island profiles the world's largest jail, with 20,000 inmates it is a city within a city. But in this city 90% of the inhabitants are black or hispanic, only 10% have graduated from high school, 20% are HIV positive, 25% test positive for tuberculosis, and 70% are there for drug-related crimes.

The residents of Rikers are murderers, thieves and pick-pockets. Entire cell blocks are filled with pregnant women; specific jails are reserved for gay inmates. Solitary confinement is a special place for inmates like Eddie White, who has already escaped three times. Another man, an HIV+ addict named Jimmy, was born in jail to a drug addicted mother and is likely to die in jail, too.

This Emmy-winning work, a sequel to the award-winning One Year in a Life of Crime, probes the devastating cycle of urban unemployment, crime, drugs, and incarceration. It follows two men and one woman from the time they are released from prison onto the streets of Newark, NJ with no job skills and no legal source of income. The program charts their slide back into shoplifting and shooting up, the deterioration of their own lives and the damage they inflict on their children. It exposes the brutal reality of crime and drug addiction while also contesting stereotypical explanations and mythic solutions.

Co-produced by DCTV and HBO for HBO's "America Undercover" Series.

Rape is the fastest-growing and most under-reported crime in America. Every five minutes a woman is raped.

Rape: Cries From the Heartland brutally portrays the physical and emotional trauma suffered by rape victims, who are often further victimized by the legal inability to bring their assailants to justice. Profiles of seven victims whose range in age from eight to seventy-two include visits to hospitals and police stations, interviews with rape crisis counselors and law enforcement officials, and the outcome of each victim's legal battle.

Filmed at the Rape Crisis Center in Memphis, Tennessee, the film presents a disturbing portrait of rape as it really is - an act of violence, not sex - and reveals many of the ways in which this is still one the least understood crimes.

Everyday 96,000 crimes are committed in the United States. Every year more of our nation's youth choose a criminal path instead of an honest one. DCTV decided to go out and find some of these faceless criminals in order to discover what made them follow a life of crime and to find out what society can do to curb the growing epidemic of crime in America.

One Year in a Life of Crime follows Robert, Mike, and Freddy--three professional criminals from Newark, New Jersey. Every day they get in their cars, drive to the suburbs, and steal $500 to $1,000 worth of merchandise. For 12 months we documented their lives. With hidden cameras we recorded a number of crimes as they were actually happening. The ease with which Robert and Freddy cleaned out the silverware in a department store is astounding.

How did these three young men break away from the rules of society and wind up outside the law? We went into their homes to try to find out.

If you are arrested in New York City and can't make bail, Riker's Island will be your new home. Most young men in New York City have a better chance of going to Rikers Island than they do of going to college.

Lock-Up: The Prisoners of Rikers Island profiles the world's largest jail, with 20,000 inmates it is a city within a city. But in this city 90% of the inhabitants are black or hispanic, only 10% have graduated from high school, 20% are HIV positive, 25% test positive for tuberculosis, and 70% are there for drug-related crimes.

The residents of Rikers are murderers, thieves and pick-pockets. Entire cell blocks are filled with pregnant women; specific jails are reserved for gay inmates. Solitary confinement is a special place for inmates like Eddie White, who has already escaped three times. Another man, an HIV+ addict named Jimmy, was born in jail to a drug addicted mother and is likely to die in jail, too.

This Emmy-winning work, a sequel to the award-winning One Year in a Life of Crime, probes the devastating cycle of urban unemployment, crime, drugs, and incarceration. It follows two men and one woman from the time they are released from prison onto the streets of Newark, NJ with no job skills and no legal source of income. The program charts their slide back into shoplifting and shooting up, the deterioration of their own lives and the damage they inflict on their children. It exposes the brutal reality of crime and drug addiction while also contesting stereotypical explanations and mythic solutions.

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