International

Turkey sits at a cultural and geographic crossroads where the Eastern and Western worlds meet. Historically a devoutly Muslim country, Turkey — from the volatile eastern Kurdish region near the Iraqi border, to the industrial central region of Anatolia, to the world-class city of Istanbul — is today anything but homogeneous. As it enters what may be the final chapter in its 40-year quest to join the European Union, Turkey remains a country many Westerners still struggle to understand.

For more info, visit PBS. You can watch Turkey's Tigers here.

The Bridge follows two Americans and two Egyptians as they share their lives and their countries. We follow Spirit, an Atlanta radio therapist as she packs up her high heels and travels to Cairo to meet her Egyptian counterpart Bothaina, a politically active television talk show host. We watch Mike, a cowboy from Mobile Alabama, learn to ride a camel and forge a lasting a relationship with Mahmoud, an Egyptian horse trainer. We also follow the Egyptians on their visit to the US, as they learn about everything from baseball and hot dogs to our history of slavery.

During this adventure, Spirit, Mike, Bothiana and Mahmoud depart from their “normal” life, and travel to a foreign land where they learn to see the world from a different perspective. Through this experience they are able to appreciate and celebrate our common humanity.

China's Unnatural Disaster: The Tears of Sichuan Province, the latest documentary from DCTV's Jon Alpert and Matt O'Neill, details the aftermath of the earthquake that struck China's Sichuan Province in 2008. The earthquake killed over 70,000 people, 10,000 of which were the province's children. Alpert and O'Neill's documentary uncovers the sorrow, pain and outrage of the bereaved families as they cope with their loss and demand answers of the government.

China's Unnatural Disaster: The Tears of Sichuan Province, the latest documentary from DCTV's Jon Alpert and Matt O'Neill, details the aftermath of the earthquake that struck China's Sichuan Province in 2008. The earthquake killed over 70,000 people, 10,000 of which were the province's children. Alpert and O'Neill's documentary uncovers the sorrow, pain and outrage of the bereaved families as they cope with their loss and demand answers of the government.

Following up on their landmark documentary Vietnam: Picking Up the Pieces, DCTV returns to the war-torn land to locate many of the subjects they filmed eight years before, just after the fall of Saigon. The resulting film, Vietnam: Talking to the People, offers a penetrating view of a country deeply embedded in the American consciousness, and the picture that emerges is one of determination, hardship, humor and resiliency.

Jon Alpert and Keiko Tsuno made headlines with a 1977 journalistic coup when they became the first American television crew allowed back into Vietnam after the U.S. withdrawal and were given unprecedented access to the ruined countryside and its people. The resulting "up-close" study of Vietnam's grim postwar reality relies on the voices of the common people to tell their stories: a 14-year-old prostitute, war orphans, an American translator turned opium addict . Traveling through North and South Vietnam, Alpert and Tsuno elicit memories of the war and reveal its scars in a compelling, first-hand indictment of the United States' role in the country's devastation. This history-making document describes the painful process of transition for the people living in the "New Vietnam."

Originally aired on the Discovery-Times Channel.

Unique insight into the forces that almost unseated President Hugo Chavez in a recall election during the summer of 2004.

Truth becomes a relative term as the population of Venezuela grows increasingly polarized while grappling with President Hugo Chavez and his agenda. Chavez promises a revolution that will redistribute the country's oil wealth to the poor and uses the history of the United States' complicated relationship with Venezuela and South America to rally support to his side.

At once the story of democracy, Venezuelan-style, and a snapshot of the unraveling of U.S. foreign policy, Venezuela: Revolution in Progress gives unique insight into the forces that nearly unseated President Chavez in a recall election during the summer of 2004.

A collection of stories from day-to-day life in the Vietnam of 1990.

From bar girls and roller-skaters to Amerasian youth, the centerpiece is the story of Nguyen Van Lan's 15-year separation from his family. As the Vietnam war was ending, Lan, a South Vietnamese army officer, put his pregnant wife on the last plane out of Saigon, destined for America, where she arrived, gave birth to their daughter, and wondered if she would ever see her husband again. Lan wound up in a re-education camp, and after 15 years of imprisonment, is finally free to join his family in the U.S. How will he adjust to his long-lost family, and to America, so different from the world he knows?

This is no longer Mao's China; not even Red China. It's the new China.

Every year China's economy struggles to absorb 20 million new unemployed, while the newly rich move to gated communities with private schools and tennis courts.

Once the home of the "iron rice bowl" and social equality for all, China has joined the ranks of the World Trade Organization. The country's new commitment to private enterprise and free markets may change China more in a single year than most countries change in a decade. This extraordinarily candid film introduces viewers to a cross-section of China's population, from the unemployed to the working poor, all the way up the laddar to the nouveau riche.

Some of the chilly old winds of the Cold War are beginning to blow between the United States and Russia.

To create communication and understanding, five of Russia’s most talented TV reporters hopped aboard the CyberCar – a 40-foot long bus with a Times Square video wall on the side.

From the hollowed hills of Kentucky to the horrors of Hurricane Katrina – from the beaches of Brooklyn to the bayous of Cajun country – the inquisitive Russians searched for the soul of America. Concurrently, they shared slices of Siberian and Post-Soviet life through reports they played on the TV wall to crowds of Americans who gathered around the bus, eager to exchange ideas and experiences.

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