Political Action

A Co-Production of DCTV and Discovery-Times Channel.

Can Mr. Smith still go to Washington? Follow five U.S. veterans in their quest to take back Capital Hill.

In November 2006, more than 50 veterans of the U.S. armed forces from around the country compete for seats in Congress. Not since WWII have so many veterans run for national office at the same time. The award-winning filmmaking team of Brent and Craig Renaud (Off To War, Dope Sick Love) follow five of these candidates, most with no prior political experience or aspirations, who chose political action as a means to further answer the call of service to their country. Taking the Hill is about a group of outsiders fighting political battles and motivated by a desire to serve their country — this time not by going to war, but by going to Washington, D.C.

Low turnout among our nation's youngest voters (18-24) is a growing epidemic. In the 1998 State and Federal elections, less than one fifth of the eligible youth voted. While young people are often the subject of political discussion, their opinions are seldom included in civic dialogue...until Speak Up!

This exciting youth-produced documentary chronicles the Speak Up New York! civic engagement initiative that spent a month on the road, visiting over 20 cities across New York State, holding over 45 civic engagement events, and registering over 2,000 new voters. Thousands of young people and at least 75 local officials and candidates participated. Using our state-of-the-art Cybercar, a full production studio on wheels with a huge exterior video wall, DCTV crossed New York State to record the voices and views of young New Yorkers and brings their ideas to local politicians, including the candidates for Governor.

On September 11, 2001, the date of one of the greatest tragedies in the history of America, and certainly of New York City, another major event was taking place: the primaries for the NYC Mayoral Election.

Throughout July and August of 2001, Jon Alpert and his team went on the campaign trail with each of the seven major party candidates to capture a "day in the life." Taking viewers behind the scenes, starting at home for breakfast, standing at subway entrances, visiting churches, temples and mosques, attending fundraisers, firemen's picnics, parades and strategy sessions, Campaign Confidential goes inside the men's exhausting campaign days from beginning to bitter end and provides a thought-provoking backstage view of the men who want to lead the capital of the world.

In the fall of 2000, Access Democracy helped to register 150,000 new voters in a little more than two months.

Main Street USA charts the maiden voyage of DCTV’s Cybercar, a 21st century mobile television studio with a giant Times Square-style video screen mounted on the side allowing the public to view video segments and participate in live broadcasts from any location.

On the second anniversary of the devastating attacks of September 11th, 2001, the Cybercar takes a tour of twelve Main Streets across America. The one thing that holds true throughout the tour is that no two Main Streets are alike. The Main Street of Jonesborough, Tennessee is quaint and picturesque, while the windows are broken and boarded in East Saint Louis.

A Co-Production of DCTV and Discovery-Times Channel.

Can Mr. Smith still go to Washington? Follow five U.S. veterans in their quest to take back Capital Hill.

In November 2006, more than 50 veterans of the U.S. armed forces from around the country compete for seats in Congress. Not since WWII have so many veterans run for national office at the same time. The award-winning filmmaking team of Brent and Craig Renaud (Off To War, Dope Sick Love) follow five of these candidates, most with no prior political experience or aspirations, who chose political action as a means to further answer the call of service to their country. Taking the Hill is about a group of outsiders fighting political battles and motivated by a desire to serve their country — this time not by going to war, but by going to Washington, D.C.

Low turnout among our nation's youngest voters (18-24) is a growing epidemic. In the 1998 State and Federal elections, less than one fifth of the eligible youth voted. While young people are often the subject of political discussion, their opinions are seldom included in civic dialogue...until Speak Up!

This exciting youth-produced documentary chronicles the Speak Up New York! civic engagement initiative that spent a month on the road, visiting over 20 cities across New York State, holding over 45 civic engagement events, and registering over 2,000 new voters. Thousands of young people and at least 75 local officials and candidates participated. Using our state-of-the-art Cybercar, a full production studio on wheels with a huge exterior video wall, DCTV crossed New York State to record the voices and views of young New Yorkers and brings their ideas to local politicians, including the candidates for Governor.

Main Street USA charts the maiden voyage of DCTV’s Cybercar, a 21st century mobile television studio with a giant Times Square-style video screen mounted on the side allowing the public to view video segments and participate in live broadcasts from any location.

On the second anniversary of the devastating attacks of September 11th, 2001, the Cybercar takes a tour of twelve Main Streets across America. The one thing that holds true throughout the tour is that no two Main Streets are alike. The Main Street of Jonesborough, Tennessee is quaint and picturesque, while the windows are broken and boarded in East Saint Louis.

On September 11, 2001, the date of one of the greatest tragedies in the history of America, and certainly of New York City, another major event was taking place: the primaries for the NYC Mayoral Election.

Throughout July and August of 2001, Jon Alpert and his team went on the campaign trail with each of the seven major party candidates to capture a "day in the life." Taking viewers behind the scenes, starting at home for breakfast, standing at subway entrances, visiting churches, temples and mosques, attending fundraisers, firemen's picnics, parades and strategy sessions, Campaign Confidential goes inside the men's exhausting campaign days from beginning to bitter end and provides a thought-provoking backstage view of the men who want to lead the capital of the world.

In the fall of 2000, Access Democracy helped to register 150,000 new voters in a little more than two months.

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