Social Issue

It seems hard to believe that in the world's most affluent country, where farmers are paid millions of dollars not to produce food, hunger is a growing epidemic. Foodbanks throughout the country continue to report a tremendous rise in the demand for their services. Hungry families struggle to feed themselves in their middle class neighborhoods.

The newly poor are victims of job loss, illness and misfortune and learn to survive by harvesting the wasted food and resources of suburbia from dumpsters and unharvested produce from farms. Residents convince restaurants and supermarkets to donate food so that the hungry won't starve. At one site, volunteers cook the contributions and serve lunch to more than 200 people a day.

Produced in association with The TV Lab at WNET/Thirteen.

A dramatic expose on the disparity of health care services for the rich and poor in America. This incisive investigative report exemplifies DCTV's advocacy journalism. With the viewer as direct witness to unfolding life-and-death dramas, this often shocking document contrasts two New York City hospitals: Kings County, an overcrowded, understaffed city-run institution, and the Downstate Medical Center, a well-financed private hospital. With strong, often graphic footage, this indictment of the economics of the American medical system is articulated through the voices of the victimized patients and beleaguered hospital personnel.

"If I poisoned someone, they would put me away for life, but the company I worked for poisoned me and got away with it," says a disabled worker.

Hard Metals Disease is the shocking story of the Valenite Corporation, a subsidiary of General Telephone and Electric (GTE) and an international corporation with factories in the U.S., Mexico and Canada. This investigative documentary spent four years tracking Valenite activities. Did Valenite knowingly expose its workers to hazardous substances? What happens to jobs and workers when factories move to Mexico? The trail of dead and sick workers Valenite left behind raises questions about corporate responsibility.

It seems hard to believe that in the world's most affluent country, where farmers are paid millions of dollars not to produce food, hunger is a growing epidemic. Foodbanks throughout the country continue to report a tremendous rise in the demand for their services. Hungry families struggle to feed themselves in their middle class neighborhoods.

The newly poor are victims of job loss, illness and misfortune and learn to survive by harvesting the wasted food and resources of suburbia from dumpsters and unharvested produce from farms. Residents convince restaurants and supermarkets to donate food so that the hungry won't starve. At one site, volunteers cook the contributions and serve lunch to more than 200 people a day.

Produced in association with The TV Lab at WNET/Thirteen.

A dramatic expose on the disparity of health care services for the rich and poor in America. This incisive investigative report exemplifies DCTV's advocacy journalism. With the viewer as direct witness to unfolding life-and-death dramas, this often shocking document contrasts two New York City hospitals: Kings County, an overcrowded, understaffed city-run institution, and the Downstate Medical Center, a well-financed private hospital. With strong, often graphic footage, this indictment of the economics of the American medical system is articulated through the voices of the victimized patients and beleaguered hospital personnel.

"If I poisoned someone, they would put me away for life, but the company I worked for poisoned me and got away with it," says a disabled worker.

Hard Metals Disease is the shocking story of the Valenite Corporation, a subsidiary of General Telephone and Electric (GTE) and an international corporation with factories in the U.S., Mexico and Canada. This investigative documentary spent four years tracking Valenite activities. Did Valenite knowingly expose its workers to hazardous substances? What happens to jobs and workers when factories move to Mexico? The trail of dead and sick workers Valenite left behind raises questions about corporate responsibility.

Syndicate content