War

Section 60: Arlington National Cemetary provides rare, intimate glimpses of the loss, love and pride felt by Section 60 visitors, underscoring the human toll exacted by the military conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan, while honoring those who sacrificed their lives for their country. Jon Alpert and Matthew O'Neill capture the sights and sounds of this quiet pocket of Arlington National Cemetery, where families and friends grieve, honor, remember and find comfort and community with others who share profound loss. A reverent snapshot of the ever-expanding Section 60, the film comprises vignettes shot from early morning to sundown.

Three-time Emmy winning actor James Gandolfini serves as Executive Producer of Alive Day Memories: Home From Iraq, a documentary which looks at the physical and emotional cost of war through soldiers' memories of their "alive day," the day they narrowly escaped death in Iraq.

In a war that has left more than 25,000 wounded, Alive Day Memories looks at this new generation of veterans. For the first time in history, 90% of the wounded survive their injuries, but a greater percentage of these men and women are returning with amputations, traumatic brain injuries and severe post-traumatic stress.

In Alive Day Memories, Gandolfini interviews ten soldiers who reveal their feelings on their future, their severe disabilities, and their devotion to America.

Trailer

In 2007, HBO Documentary Films released Alive Day Memories: Home from Iraq, created by a team that included Ellen Goosenberg Kent, Sheila Nevins and James Gandolfini, as well as DCTV's own Jon Alpert and Matt O'Neill. In Alive Day, the emotional and physical damage inflicted on our soldiers was revealed, when veterans recalled their "alive day," the day they nearly died in combat.

"You can learn about war by walking through this facility...the horrors of what man can do to man are visualized right here. But we do our best, our level best, to make sure our people survive and make it back to their homes." - -- Col. Casper P. Jones III, Commander: 86th Combat Support Hospital.

15-time Emmy® winner Jon Alpert and Matthew O'Neill were allowed unprecedented access to the 86th Combat Support Hospital in Iraq. Over a two-month period, they captured the day-to-day lives of doctors, nurses, medics, soldiers and chaplains in the Army's premier medical facility. Baghdad ER chronicles those two months, paying tribute to the heroism of U.S. military and medical personnel while offering an unflinching and at times graphic look at the realities of war.

As Americans wait in anticipation to see how the dawn of a new Iraq will unfold, many questions about the war, and about life under Saddam, remain unanswered. Imagine being able to call up an old friend and ask those questions, directly, honestly, with no hesitation. This is what happened when DCTV and Chat the Planet brought together the youth of the critically acclaimed Bridge to Baghdad to speak again for the first time since the bombs fell.

Bridge to Baghdad I was filmed on March 1, 2003, just two weeks before the start of the war. Airing on WorldLink TV, NHK and a host of independent media outlets, American audiences were captivated by the simple premise of the show: connecting the youth of New York City and the youth of Baghdad for a no-holds-barred conversation. Afterwards, during the war, the American teenagers waited anxiously stateside for phone calls and emails that never came. Were their new friends dead or alive?

Filmed on March 1, 2003, just two weeks before the start of what was to become “Operation Iraqi Freedom,” Bridge to Baghdad 1 connects the youth of New York City to the youth of Baghdad for an unprecedented conversation about the futures of the lands they will someday govern.

With the threat of war looming, an array of young Americans gather in New York where they are linked by satelite to Baghdad to "meet" the teenagers of Iraq for the first time. The Iraqi teens, educated, thoughtful and poised young men and women, speak their minds about the impending war, American culture and what they want Americans to know about their homeland. Adamant in their hopes for a peaceful resolution but reticent about Saddam’s regime, the Iraqi youth allow the cameras into their lives and their homes, providing the American audience with a much-needed glimpse into Saddam-era Iraq.

Documentarian Jon Alpert accompanies Masuda Sultan, a 23-year-old Afghan-American woman, as she travels back to Kandahar, Afghanistan to see what has become of her country after 9/11. Masuda is delighted to see the yoke of the Taliban lifted, but horrified to find out what happened to her family. Seeking refuge from the American bombing, a large number of her family escaped to the small village of Chowkar-karez, 60 miles north of Kandahar. Then, on October 22, 2001, Chowkar-Karez was attacked by the American military. 41 civilians were killed. 19 of them were members of Masuda’s family. Masuda, who supports America's effort against terrorism, wants to know why her family had to die in the desert.

TRT 51:45 min | English | Color

A Downtown Community Television Center and Discovery Times Channel production.

From the farms and fields of Arkansas to the deadly streets of Baghdad, Off to War tracks the citizen soldiers of the Arkansas National Guard as they come face to face with the horror of war.

Never before has a single unit of soldiers been followed from the beginning to the end of their deployment at war. In April 2004, filmmakers Brent and Craig Renaud arrived in Iraq with the Arkansas National Guard during one of the bloodiest months to date. Within twenty-four hours of their arrival, one of the guardsmen lay dead. By the end of the first month, the unit had lost more soldiers than any other National Guard Brigade in Iraq.

Originally slated for broadcast on NBC news in 1991, Inside Iraq: No Place to Hide was yanked just three hours before airtime. Was this coverage, which revealed that the Gulf War was not as clean and easy as the US media presentation had implied, too hot for TV?

Traveling through Iraq, DCTV’s filmmakers were able to visit a number of Iraqi cities whose infrastructure had been entirely destroyed. Water, electricity, and medicine were in short supply. Doctors stood helpless as the wounded suffered and starving babies died in their mothers’ arms.

Inside Iraq (re-edited in 2002) is certain to provoke intense discussion about censorship and the role of media in wartime.

A DCTV and Discovery Times Channel production.

From the farms and fields of Arkansas to the deadly streets of Baghdad, Off to War tracks the citizen soldiers of the Arkansas National Guard as they come face to face with the horror of war.

Never before has a single unit of soldiers been followed from the beginning to the end of their deployment at war. In April 2004, filmmakers Brent and Craig Renaud arrived in Iraq with the Arkansas National Guard during one of the bloodiest months to date. Within twenty-four hours of their arrival, one of the guardsmen lay dead. By the end of the first month, the unit had lost more soldiers than any other National Guard Brigade in Iraq.

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