Life Under Radiation

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Wed, 10/26/2011 - 7:30pm
DCTV, 87 Lafayette Street, NYC

The threefold catastrophe that shattered the northeast of Japan on March 11th – the 9.0 earthquake, the tsunami, and finally the ‘man made’ catastrophe of Fukushima – is already showing its consequences, most likely for decades to come. While the enormity of this catastrophe cannot be fully realized today, a dialogue has begun.

We are honored to host this special evening of film and discussion as part of Todos Somos Japon's 4-day conference, The Global Significance of 3.11 Fukushima.

Films

Protest in Japan Since Fukushima

Japan/Germany | 2011 | 70 min
Two German filmmakers explore post-Fukushima activism in Japan, illuminating the backgrounds of current movements, protests and critical voices which keep getting louder, even beyond Japan.

Nuclear Ginza: Hidden Labor Under Radiation

Nicholas Röhl | 1995 | 30 min
We follow photojournalist/anti-nuclear activist, Kenji Higuchi, as he exposes the exploitation of the “untouchables” who were pulled out of the slums of Tokyo and Osaka in order to work while exposed to radiation, often without their knowledge. Referring to the tacit cooperation and close ties between the Japanese government and the country’s nuclear industry, a man notes in one scene that “democracy has been destroyed where nuclear power stations exist.” The film shows how Japan, having suffered nuclear attacks in the past, remarkably transformed itself within a few decades into one of the most “nuclearized” nations worldwide.

Post-Screening Discussion

Although information has been coming in from Japan since the 3.11 Fukushima nuclear accident, there is still a wide disparity between American's knowledge of it, and what the Japanese people are currently thinking and doing about it. Three intellectuals/activists from Japan, Yoshihiko Ikegami, Ayumi Goto and Chigaya Kinoshita, will share their first-hand experiences and discuss the significance of the situation, the question of our human survival, and the global struggles for it. Moderated by Yuko Tonohira.

Tickets

$6